Arviat

The name Arviat comes from arviq, the Inuktitut name for bowhead whale. The community (population 2500 roughly) is on the western shore of Hudson Bay, north of Churchill, Manitoba. Arviat’s land and waters are rich in wildlife. The McConnell River Migratory Bird Sanctuary, south of town, is full of thousands of nesting waterfowl. In the fall, beluga whales are frequently seen in the bays around town and caribou are often spotted near the community. Arviat is a diverse community where traditional knowledge and values are maintained in harmony with practical economic development. The Inuktitut language remains very strong among residents.

Latest Projects

A territory-wide program focusing on advancing climate change adaptation knowledge and decision-making  on resource development in Nunavut.

This research created a community-based evaluation framework to monitor and evaluate adaptation projects. Evaluating these projects can help us to learn from and improve projects. The framework was tested in Arviat on the ‘Terrain Analysis in Nunavut’ project, a Government of Nunavut project using satellite radar images to see if the ground is moving to detect permafrost degradation.

Addressing climate change and identifying approaches for supporting current and future climate change adaptation projects across the Canadian Arctic.

Arviat Goes Green  was produced by the The Aqquimavvik Society in Arviat  to identify how climate change is impacting their community and how to deal with these changes. 

 

What do your elders and community leaders in Nunavut have to say about changing climate conditions over the years? Do you have images of your region that show the effects of climate change? Submit a community report and add your contribution to our store of knowledge.

Climate Change Introduction was produced by The Aqqiumavvik Society in Arviat to address climate change impacts in Arviat. 

Research on Arctic marine mammals via the collection of detailed empirical information throughout Canadian Arctic marine ecosystems, using a variety of methods including both scientific and local knowledge.

The ‘Our Changing Land, Our Changing People:  Building Nunavut’s Climate Resilience’ workshop was hosted to address how Nunavut can become more resilient in light of climate change. The workshop took place in Iqaluit between January 31 and February 2, 2017

Seasonal changes in the northern landscape, together with extreme weather events, can create instability and hazards, including flooding, landslides, thaw failure and subsidence, coastal ice push, storm surges, and coastal erosion. Our project team is measuring both the drivers of change and the effects of instability in community landscapes at selected sites across the Arctic.

Using in-depth case studies, this project will identify and characterize the vulnerability of food systems in four regional Inuit centers (RIC) (Iqaluit, Arviat, Inuvik and Kuujjuak) to climate change as a basis for identifying adaptation entry points.

What can you do to help?

Tell us about what's happening in and around your community, post pictures and add to our database of Inuit Quajimajatuqangit about climate change.

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