Weather & Precipitation

Project Titlesort descending Post Date Summary
A Summary of MethylMercury and Climate Change Research in Nunavut 06-27-2016

Mercury (Hg) is a toxic heavy metal that changes into various chemical forms through geochemical processes. It is an element that occurs naturally in the environment but with industrialization, humans have altered its cycle by adding more mercury in the water, air, and soil.

ArcticNet Integrated Regional Impact Studies (IRIS) 03-16-2012

ArcticNet brings together scientists and managers with their partners from Inuit organizations, northern communities, federal and provincial agencies and the private sector to study the impacts of climate change in the coastal Canadian Arctic.

Assessing Berries to Monitor Ecological Change: a collaboration with Nunavut Arctic College's Environmental Technology Program 10-20-2015

Students of ETP have been contributing to a multidisciplinary study looking at vegetation response in a warming Arctic context, with a focus on ber

Climate Change Adaptation for Nunavut Decision Makers Course 03-27-2015

This course informs government staff of climate change impacts and how to incorporate climate change into deision-making across all government sectors.

Exploring Inuit Artistic Voice about Arctic Environmental and Sea Ice Change 07-07-2015

The purpose of this doctoral research is to engage with artists to explore the perspectives of Inuit artists about environmental change, specifical

Glacier Monitoring and Assessment, Penny Ice Cap, Nunavut 09-16-2015

Higher than normal summer temperatures over the past few decades have resulted in increased melt of glaciers and ice caps in the Canadian Arctic, p

How does climate change and vegetation growth affect snow properties and permafrost temperature? 04-07-2015

The properties of snow on the ground change over time and these changes are affected by temperature and wind, i.e. climate. Lemmings live under the snow and need to travel under the snow in search of food in winter. They are therefore sensitive to snow properties and climate change may strongly affect their populations, and of course also the populations of their predators.

Instability of coastal landscapes in Arctic communities and regions 03-06-2012

Seasonal changes in the northern landscape, together with extreme weather events, can create instability and hazards, including flooding, landslides, thaw failure and subsidence, coastal ice push, storm surges, and coastal erosion. Our project team is measuring both the drivers of change and the effects of instability in community landscapes at selected sites across the Arctic.

Kangiqtugaapik (Clyde River) Weather Station Network- Silalirijiit Project 06-12-2013

Summary coming soon, but for now please visit http://www.clyderiverweather.org/ to access up-to-dat

Pan-Territorial Adaptation Initiatives 02-17-2012

Addressing climate change and identifying approaches for supporting current and future climate change adaptation projects across the Canadian Arctic.

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