Terrestrial Environment

Project Titlesort ascending Post Date Summary
The People, Animals, Water and Sustenance Program 07-28-2016

The People, Animals, Water, and Sustenance (PAWS) Project is interested in gaining a better understanding of the relationships Iqaluit Inuit have with dogs, water, and food. Currently there are gaps in our understanding of the interactions between dogs, water, and food in a Northern context. In-depth interviews on these topics coupled with sampling of dog feces, water, and clams will help us understand how these relationships interact together and how these relationships may be changing.

Pan-Territorial Adaptation Initiatives 02-17-2012

Addressing climate change and identifying approaches for supporting current and future climate change adaptation projects across the Canadian Arctic.

Nunavut Permafrost Monitoring Network 02-07-2012

A multi-community project studying the changing conditions of frozen ground to depths of 15 metres.

Nunavut Climate Change Partnership 05-27-2016

The Nunavut Climate Change Partnership (NCCP) was a collaborative partnership between the Government of Nunavut, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern De

Instability of coastal landscapes in Arctic communities and regions 03-06-2012

Seasonal changes in the northern landscape, together with extreme weather events, can create instability and hazards, including flooding, landslides, thaw failure and subsidence, coastal ice push, storm surges, and coastal erosion. Our project team is measuring both the drivers of change and the effects of instability in community landscapes at selected sites across the Arctic.

Industrial development and Arctic communities: environmental and social change 03-06-2012

This project will explore the cultural, economic and environmental impacts of mineral exploration and development on four Arctic communities.

Incorporating Climate Change into Land Development 08-31-2016

Permafrost vulnerability maps were developed for seven communities. These maps are useful for people who are making decisions about where and how to put infrastructure in Nunavut communities, and gives us more information around current conditions.

Impacts of climate change for the marine Arctic 03-06-2012

Some implications of climate change for the marine Arctic ecosystem are fairly intuitive. For instance, polar bears and ringed seals are bound to be negatively impacted by the loss of ice that provides the physical platform for their hunting and reproduction. Other consequences are less obvious.

How to evaluate climate change adaptation in permafrost environment: A pilot study in Arviat, Nunavut 07-06-2016

Why was this project important?

How to evaluate climate change adaptation in a permafrost environment: A pilot study in Arviat, Nunavut 10-04-2016

This research created a community-based evaluation framework to monitor and evaluate adaptation projects. Evaluating these projects can help us to learn from and improve projects. The framework was tested in Arviat on the ‘Terrain Analysis in Nunavut’ project, a Government of Nunavut project using satellite radar images to see if the ground is moving to detect permafrost degradation.