Resolute Bay

The second northernmost community in Canada, Resolute Bay is located in the High Arctic on the south coast of Cornwallis Island. The gateway to the High Arctic, Resolute Bay (pop. 257) is the major stopover for expeditions to the North Pole and to Quttinirpaaq (Ellesmere Island) National Park, and a base for scientific research.

There is a weather station as well as the Polar Continental Shelf Project research camp located within the community. Resolute’s history has the most European influence of all the Nunavut communities. The site was a critical junction along the Northwest Passage, the famed route to Asia sought by European explorers in the 18th and 19th centuries. The community is named after the HMS Resolute, a British ship that searched for the lost Franklin expedition.

Latest Projects

A territory-wide program focusing on advancing climate change adaptation knowledge and decision-making  on resource development in Nunavut.

Addressing climate change and identifying approaches for supporting current and future climate change adaptation projects across the Canadian Arctic.

What do your elders and community leaders in Nunavut have to say about changing climate conditions over the years? Do you have images of your region that show the effects of climate change? Submit a community report and add your contribution to our store of knowledge.

A study of the absorption and release of carbon dioxide by the Arctic Ocean.

Seasonal changes in the northern landscape, together with extreme weather events, can create instability and hazards, including flooding, landslides, thaw failure and subsidence, coastal ice push, storm surges, and coastal erosion. Our project team is measuring both the drivers of change and the effects of instability in community landscapes at selected sites across the Arctic.

Our project examines the fundamental questions: what is Arctic security? What should policy makers anticipate that the circumpolar world will look like in the future, given the various forces that are now transforming this region?

Climate warming is driving a rapid transformation of polar ecosystems, and we urgently need to study the vulnerability of seafloor biodiversity to changes that are already underway.

To what extent will shipping develop in the Northwest and Northeast Passages, and with what kind of shipping: will it be transit shipping, fishing, tourism, transportation induced by natural resources mining?

This project brings together key sea ice researchers to examine the processes that cause the observed changes in sea ice dynamic and thermodynamic processes, snow cover, and physical coupling across the ocean-sea ice-atmosphere (OSA) interface.

To determine the impacts of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems and freshwater quality and availability in the High Arctic, we created a water-shed and landscape ecosystem observation network. 

What can you do to help?

Tell us about what's happening in and around your community, post pictures and add to our database of Inuit Quajimajatuqangit about climate change.

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