Pond Inlet

Pond Inlet is located on the northeastern shore of Baffin Island, across from Bylot Island. It is known to the Inuit as Mittimatalik, “the place where Mittima is buried”. Although the name remains, the identity of Mittima is a mystery to the present-day people of Pond Inlet.

Pond Inlet, home to just below 1,500 inhabitants, is one of Nunavut’s treasure troves. The gorgeous scenery is a mix of mountains, glaciers, and icebergs that attract many tourists from all over the world. As part of the Government of Nunavut’s decentralization strategy to create jobs throughout Nunavut, Pond Inlet is now a Qikiqtani regional centre for the Department of Economic Development and Transportation. The community looks to the growth sectors of government, tourism and businesses involving arts and crafts and wildlife harvesting for future economic development.

Latest Projects

Climate warming is driving a rapid transformation of polar ecosystems, and we urgently need to study the vulnerability of seafloor biodiversity to changes that are already underway.

To what extent will shipping develop in the Northwest and Northeast Passages, and with what kind of shipping: will it be transit shipping, fishing, tourism, transportation induced by natural resources mining?

This project brings together key sea ice researchers to examine the processes that cause the observed changes in sea ice dynamic and thermodynamic processes, snow cover, and physical coupling across the ocean-sea ice-atmosphere (OSA) interface.

Many northern ecosystems are undergoing major shifts related to climate change.

The Geological Survey of Canada has developed a summary database and map of recent permafrost temperatures for Nunavut Canada. The database includes publicly available information from over 100 boreholes.

Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre hosted a 3-day youth photovoice research training workshop from September 26-28, 2014.

This course informs government staff of climate change impacts and how to incorporate climate change into deision-making across all government sectors.

The properties of snow on the ground change over time and these changes are affected by temperature and wind, i.e. climate. Lemmings live under the snow and need to travel under the snow in search of food in winter. They are therefore sensitive to snow properties and climate change may strongly affect their populations, and of course also the populations of their predators.

Carbon cycle dynamics in response to permafrost degradation is a ‘hot topic’ in northern research. We are particularly interested in greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4) emitted from ‘thermokarst’ aquatic ecosystems, i.e. ponds and lakes formed by the thawing of ice-rich permafrost.

What can you do to help?

Tell us about what's happening in and around your community, post pictures and add to our database of Inuit Quajimajatuqangit about climate change.

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