Pond Inlet

Pond Inlet is located on the northeastern shore of Baffin Island, across from Bylot Island. It is known to the Inuit as Mittimatalik, “the place where Mittima is buried”. Although the name remains, the identity of Mittima is a mystery to the present-day people of Pond Inlet.

Pond Inlet, home to just below 1,500 inhabitants, is one of Nunavut’s treasure troves. The gorgeous scenery is a mix of mountains, glaciers, and icebergs that attract many tourists from all over the world. As part of the Government of Nunavut’s decentralization strategy to create jobs throughout Nunavut, Pond Inlet is now a Qikiqtani regional centre for the Department of Economic Development and Transportation. The community looks to the growth sectors of government, tourism and businesses involving arts and crafts and wildlife harvesting for future economic development.

Projects

This project brings together key sea ice researchers to examine the processes that cause the observed changes in sea ice dynamic and thermodynamic processes, snow cover, and physical coupling across the ocean-sea ice-atmosphere (OSA) interface.

A multi-community project studying the changing conditions of frozen ground to depths of 15 metres.

The properties of snow on the ground change over time and these changes are affected by temperature and wind, i.e. climate. Lemmings live under the snow and need to travel under the snow in search of food in winter. They are therefore sensitive to snow properties and climate change may strongly affect their populations, and of course also the populations of their predators.

Seasonal changes in the northern landscape, together with extreme weather events, can create instability and hazards, including flooding, landslides, thaw failure and subsidence, coastal ice push, storm surges, and coastal erosion. Our project team is measuring both the drivers of change and the effects of instability in community landscapes at selected sites across the Arctic.

Many northern ecosystems are undergoing major shifts related to climate change.

A territory-wide program focusing on advancing climate change adaptation knowledge and decision-making  on resource development in Nunavut.

Carbon cycle dynamics in response to permafrost degradation is a ‘hot topic’ in northern research. We are particularly interested in greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4) emitted from ‘thermokarst’ aquatic ecosystems, i.e. ponds and lakes formed by the thawing of ice-rich permafrost.

Our project examines the fundamental questions: what is Arctic security? What should policy makers anticipate that the circumpolar world will look like in the future, given the various forces that are now transforming this region?

The Geological Survey of Canada has developed a summary database and map of recent permafrost temperatures for Nunavut Canada. The database includes publicly available information from over 100 boreholes.

Addressing climate change and identifying approaches for supporting current and future climate change adaptation projects across the Canadian Arctic.

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