Kugluktuk

Kugluktuk, formerly known as Coppermine, is situated along the banks of the Coppermine River and on the shores of the Coronation Gulf. Located north, and slightly west of Yellowknife, Kugluktuk is the most westerly community in Nunavut, with a population of around1,460. In summer, canoeists and rafters take the popular route up the Coppermine River to the scenic Bloody Falls Territorial Historic Park. Because the tundra is close to the tree line, a variety of wildlife can be viewed in the area, including grizzly bears, wolverines and moose, as well as tundra wildlife, such as muskoxen, caribou, foxes and wolves.

The people of Kugluktuk rely heavily on their traditional economy of hunting and fishing to feed and clothe their families for cultural and nutritional well-being. Community residents are also optimistic that the growth sectors of tourism, government and especially mining, will increase Kugluktuk’s economic development, alongside established traditional pursuits.

Latest Projects

A territory-wide program focusing on advancing climate change adaptation knowledge and decision-making  on resource development in Nunavut.

Addressing climate change and identifying approaches for supporting current and future climate change adaptation projects across the Canadian Arctic.

What do your elders and community leaders in Nunavut have to say about changing climate conditions over the years? Do you have images of your region that show the effects of climate change? Submit a community report and add your contribution to our store of knowledge.

Seasonal changes in the northern landscape, together with extreme weather events, can create instability and hazards, including flooding, landslides, thaw failure and subsidence, coastal ice push, storm surges, and coastal erosion. Our project team is measuring both the drivers of change and the effects of instability in community landscapes at selected sites across the Arctic.

Climate warming is driving a rapid transformation of polar ecosystems, and we urgently need to study the vulnerability of seafloor biodiversity to changes that are already underway.

This project will explore the cultural, economic and environmental impacts of mineral exploration and development on four Arctic communities.

To what extent will shipping develop in the Northwest and Northeast Passages, and with what kind of shipping: will it be transit shipping, fishing, tourism, transportation induced by natural resources mining?

The Nunavut Climate Change Centre is devoted to including Nunavut communities in their projects and outreach.  Over the last few years, we have had the opportunity to visit multiple communities including Rankin Inlet, Arviat and Cape Dorset.

This course informs government staff of climate change impacts and how to incorporate climate change into deision-making across all government sectors.

The Nunavut Climate Change Partnership (NCCP) was a collaborative partnership between the Government of Nunavut, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, and Natural Reosurces Canada to build capacity for community-level adaptation planning.

What can you do to help?

Tell us about what's happening in and around your community, post pictures and add to our database of Inuit Quajimajatuqangit about climate change.

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