Iqaluit

Iqaluit, formerly known as Frobisher Bay, is the business and government centre for the Baffin region and the capital of the territory of Nunavut. Located on the southern portion of Baffin Island on Koojesse Inlet and home to over 7.060 people, Iqaluit is the largest community in Nunavut and the gateway to the Arctic from Eastern Canada.

Iqaluit has experienced remarkable growth since the creation of Nunavut. Residents have witnessed a surge of new building construction such as the new legislative building and office buildings, as well as new residences to house the growing population. Many new companies and government offices have opened their doors to meet the demands of expansion. For more information about Iqaluit and its attractions, please visit the City of Iqaluit website at: http://www.city.iqaluit.nu.ca/.

Latest Projects

This is an updated summary of the previous project posted on December 2, 2014

To see that summary visit http://climatechangenunavut.ca/en/project/inuit-women-and-environmental-...

The Nunavut Climate Change Partnership (NCCP) was a collaborative partnership between the Government of Nunavut, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, and Natural Reosurces Canada to build capacity for community-level adaptation planning.

Mercury (Hg) is a toxic heavy metal that changes into various chemical forms through geochemical processes. It is an element that occurs naturally in the environment but with industrialization, humans have altered its cycle by adding more mercury in the water, air, and soil.

In 2005, Sheila Watt-Cloutier and 62 Inuit elders and hunters from Canada and the United States joined forces with environmental lawyers in the US and submitted a petition before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

Climate warming is driving a rapid transformation of polar ecosystems, and we urgently need to study the vulnerability of seafloor biodiversity to changes that are already underway.

The People, Animals, Water, and Sustenance (PAWS) Project is interested in gaining a better understanding of the relationships Iqaluit Inuit have with dogs, water, and food. Currently there are gaps in our understanding of the interactions between dogs, water, and food in a Northern context. In-depth interviews on these topics coupled with sampling of dog feces, water, and clams will help us understand how these relationships interact together and how these relationships may be changing.

Frobisher Bay is undergoing rapid anthropogenic and climatic change. 

Frobisher Bay is undergoing rapid anthropogenic and climatic change. 

The C-Change Project is a joint funded project with SSHRC and IDRC, headquartered out of the Telfer School of Management at the University of Ottawa.

Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre hosted a 3-day youth photovoice research training workshop from September 26-28, 2014.

What can you do to help?

Tell us about what's happening in and around your community, post pictures and add to our database of Inuit Quajimajatuqangit about climate change.

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