Iqaluit

Iqaluit, formerly known as Frobisher Bay, is the business and government centre for the Baffin region and the capital of the territory of Nunavut. Located on the southern portion of Baffin Island on Koojesse Inlet and home to over 7.060 people, Iqaluit is the largest community in Nunavut and the gateway to the Arctic from Eastern Canada.

Iqaluit has experienced remarkable growth since the creation of Nunavut. Residents have witnessed a surge of new building construction such as the new legislative building and office buildings, as well as new residences to house the growing population. Many new companies and government offices have opened their doors to meet the demands of expansion. For more information about Iqaluit and its attractions, please visit the City of Iqaluit website at: http://www.city.iqaluit.nu.ca/.

Projects

The Nunavut Climate Change Partnership (NCCP) was a collaborative partnership between the Government of Nunavut, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, and Natural Reosurces Canada to build capacity for community-level adaptation planning.

Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre hosted a 3-day youth photovoice research training workshop from September 26-28, 2014.

Frobisher Bay is undergoing rapid anthropogenic and climatic change. 

Recent research uncovered the highest rates of self-reported enteric illness (i.e., diarrhea and vomiting) reported in the world to be in Iqaluit, Nunavut, and Rigolet, Nunatsiavut.

Mercury (Hg) is a toxic heavy metal that changes into various chemical forms through geochemical processes. It is an element that occurs naturally in the environment but with industrialization, humans have altered its cycle by adding more mercury in the water, air, and soil.

This project is investigating how Inuit women in Iqaluit are experiencing climate change within the context of greater socio-economic change. 

To see the most recent summary please visit http://climatechangenunavut.ca/en/node/3869

IHACC is a multi-year, trans-disciplinary, community-based initiative working with remote Indigenous populations in the Peruvian Amazon, Canadian Arctic and Uganda to examine vulnerabilities to the health effects of climate change and develop an evidentiary base for adaption.  In the Arctic, IHAC

A territory-wide program focusing on advancing climate change adaptation knowledge and decision-making  on resource development in Nunavut.

In 2005, Sheila Watt-Cloutier and 62 Inuit elders and hunters from Canada and the United States joined forces with environmental lawyers in the US and submitted a petition before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

This course informs government staff of climate change impacts and how to incorporate climate change into deision-making across all government sectors.

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