Iqaluit

Iqaluit, formerly known as Frobisher Bay, is the business and government centre for the Baffin region and the capital of the territory of Nunavut. Located on the southern portion of Baffin Island on Koojesse Inlet and home to over 7.060 people, Iqaluit is the largest community in Nunavut and the gateway to the Arctic from Eastern Canada.

Iqaluit has experienced remarkable growth since the creation of Nunavut. Residents have witnessed a surge of new building construction such as the new legislative building and office buildings, as well as new residences to house the growing population. Many new companies and government offices have opened their doors to meet the demands of expansion. For more information about Iqaluit and its attractions, please visit the City of Iqaluit website at: http://www.city.iqaluit.nu.ca/.

Projects

Addressing climate change and identifying approaches for supporting current and future climate change adaptation projects across the Canadian Arctic.

This project brings together key sea ice researchers to examine the processes that cause the observed changes in sea ice dynamic and thermodynamic processes, snow cover, and physical coupling across the ocean-sea ice-atmosphere (OSA) interface.

Seasonal changes in the northern landscape, together with extreme weather events, can create instability and hazards, including flooding, landslides, thaw failure and subsidence, coastal ice push, storm surges, and coastal erosion. Our project team is measuring both the drivers of change and the effects of instability in community landscapes at selected sites across the Arctic.

Using in-depth case studies, this project will identify and characterize the vulnerability of food systems in four regional Inuit centers (RIC) (Iqaluit, Arviat, Inuvik and Kuujjuak) to climate change as a basis for identifying adaptation entry points.

To what extent will shipping develop in the Northwest and Northeast Passages, and with what kind of shipping: will it be transit shipping, fishing, tourism, transportation induced by natural resources mining?

What do your elders and community leaders in Nunavut have to say about changing climate conditions over the years? Do you have images of your region that show the effects of climate change? Submit a community report and add your contribution to our store of knowledge.

Our project examines the fundamental questions: what is Arctic security? What should policy makers anticipate that the circumpolar world will look like in the future, given the various forces that are now transforming this region?

The C-Change Project is a joint funded project with SSHRC and IDRC, headquartered out of the Telfer School of Management at the University of Ottawa.

Frobisher Bay is undergoing rapid anthropogenic and climatic change. 

Metal loading and retention in Arctic tundra lakes during spring runoff

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WHAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP

Tell us about what's happening in and around your community, post pictures and add to our database of Inuit Quajimajatuqangit about climate change

 

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