Cambridge Bay

Regional centre for the Kitikmeot, Cambridge Bay (pop.1,680) is a hub for business in western Nunavut. The people in this community are active in business and government, catering to tourists visiting the area for fishing and outdoor experiences and exploration companies working on Victoria Island. The Inuktitut name for Cambridge Bay is Iqaluktuuttiaq, which translates to “a good place with lots of fish.” For more information about Cambridge Bay, visit their website at: www.cambridgebay.ca.

Latest Projects

A territory-wide program focusing on advancing climate change adaptation knowledge and decision-making  on resource development in Nunavut.

Addressing climate change and identifying approaches for supporting current and future climate change adaptation projects across the Canadian Arctic.

What do your elders and community leaders in Nunavut have to say about changing climate conditions over the years? Do you have images of your region that show the effects of climate change? Submit a community report and add your contribution to our store of knowledge.

Seasonal changes in the northern landscape, together with extreme weather events, can create instability and hazards, including flooding, landslides, thaw failure and subsidence, coastal ice push, storm surges, and coastal erosion. Our project team is measuring both the drivers of change and the effects of instability in community landscapes at selected sites across the Arctic.

Our project examines the fundamental questions: what is Arctic security? What should policy makers anticipate that the circumpolar world will look like in the future, given the various forces that are now transforming this region?

Climate warming is driving a rapid transformation of polar ecosystems, and we urgently need to study the vulnerability of seafloor biodiversity to changes that are already underway.

To what extent will shipping develop in the Northwest and Northeast Passages, and with what kind of shipping: will it be transit shipping, fishing, tourism, transportation induced by natural resources mining?

This project brings together key sea ice researchers to examine the processes that cause the observed changes in sea ice dynamic and thermodynamic processes, snow cover, and physical coupling across the ocean-sea ice-atmosphere (OSA) interface.

Climate change pressures, such as warmer temperatures and sea ice decline, transform the Arctic marine ecosystem and could lead to major shifts in its functioning. This study will combine diverse but complementary methods to study the Arctic marine ecosystem and itsinterconnectedness with Inuit communities in the context of a changing Arctic.

This course informs government staff of climate change impacts and how to incorporate climate change into deision-making across all government sectors.

What can you do to help?

Tell us about what's happening in and around your community, post pictures and add to our database of Inuit Quajimajatuqangit about climate change.

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