Arviat

The name Arviat comes from arviq, the Inuktitut name for bowhead whale. The community (population 2500 roughly) is on the western shore of Hudson Bay, north of Churchill, Manitoba. Arviat’s land and waters are rich in wildlife. The McConnell River Migratory Bird Sanctuary, south of town, is full of thousands of nesting waterfowl. In the fall, beluga whales are frequently seen in the bays around town and caribou are often spotted near the community. Arviat is a diverse community where traditional knowledge and values are maintained in harmony with practical economic development. The Inuktitut language remains very strong among residents.

Latest Projects

The Nunavut Climate Change Centre is devoted to including Nunavut communities in their projects and outreach.  Over the last few years, we have had the opportunity to visit multiple communities including Rankin Inlet, Arviat and Cape Dorset.

This course informs government staff of climate change impacts and how to incorporate climate change into deision-making across all government sectors.

This three part project started in fall 2014 assesses the current state of government-driven adaptation in Nunavut, including linkages, barriers, and interactions across scales.

The Nunavut Climate Change Partnership (NCCP) was a collaborative partnership between the Government of Nunavut, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, and Natural Reosurces Canada to build capacity for community-level adaptation planning.

Mercury (Hg) is a toxic heavy metal that changes into various chemical forms through geochemical processes. It is an element that occurs naturally in the environment but with industrialization, humans have altered its cycle by adding more mercury in the water, air, and soil.

This research looks at the causes of search and rescue (SAR) and more broadly unintentional injuries on the land in Nunavut. We focus on SAR because of the health and cultural importance to being on the land.

What can you do to help?

Tell us about what's happening in and around your community, post pictures and add to our database of Inuit Quajimajatuqangit about climate change.

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